Material Girl in an Immaterial World

Well, it has been dubbed the year of horror by Vulture and anyone who has their eyes glued to current events. There’s a lot of truth to the former assertion as well, though some might more appropriately suggest the term ‘thriller’ instead. The box office has been kind to the grittier, more adult-oriented films thus far, with…

Moonlight Teaches Us How To Tell A Life Story, Take Note

When Boyhood came out in 2014, it had a lot of hype around it. Not only because it took Richard Linklater 12 years to film (which was really only 36 weeks), but because it supposedly gave audiences something to dwell on. The idea was that the use of ‘actual time’ as an element in the film played…

Split is M. Night Shyamalan’s Love Letter to Hitchcock

Back in film school, I ended up watching a lot of films from a variety of directors. I think it was good to have that kind of exposure to all different kinds of cinema. That being said, we never spent a lot of time focusing on the work of directors. Auteur theory was drilled into our…

In Silence, Martin Scorsese Finally Answers His Catholic Guilt

The first movie I watched in 2017 was absolutely the right way to start off 2017. After the lackluster cinematic year that we had last year, I was determined to spend the time mining for a nugget of celluloid gold, rather than waste my time indulging in the mediocrity the “new” January movies offer. That’s why I…

The Best Films I Saw in 2016

Any good film enthusiast has their own list of the best films of the year. I didn’t get to see all the films I had hoped to see in 2016, but I managed to see quite a few. I figure ten is a good number to count down from because it adds a degree of…

The Most Wonderful Time of Year For Movies

Thanksgiving has passed and that means the weather gets a bit more crisp, the night gets a little longer and the amount of films released per week begins to grow. December brings many things for the cinephiles of the world: huge blockbusters, a slew of indie films vying for their shot at the Oscar, and…

The Tumultuous Trade of Deception for Power

The movies have always had a certain power over me. From the moment that I sit down, my eyes become subject to whatever agenda is put in front of me, be it casual, ideologically driven or otherwise. Whether or not you find yourself in agreement with the characters or their choices, it would be committing…

Whit Stillman’s Parabolic Career Trajectory

I’ve been a fan of Whit Stillman for a long time and he’s a particularly easy director to follow, especially considering the meager nature of his oeuvre. The only complaint that I have about him is that he doesn’t work as consistently as I would like and I don’t seem to be the only one who…

Why This Election Season Is Perfect For “The Nightmare Before Christmas”

A tall male figure stands in front of a large crowd and preaches about the necessary changes this mostly-dead society must make to survive. This man wants a job. He wants this job so badly, even though he really hasn’t had the much necessary experience  the position requires. His sycophantic zombie audience seems ready to send him…

The Return to the Elegant Simplicity of Westerns on Film

It has been some time since the genre “Western” had prominence in pop cinema. Back in the days where John Ford found himself on the right side of the camera, Westerns were pretty abundant. They weren’t the dominating genre of the era, but I will say they have fallen from prominence. Something about the “shoot-em-up” gunslinger…

The Cost (Inflation-Adjusted) of Hope in 50’s Cinema.

The 1950’s – an era synonymous with new hope. In postwar America, citizens were no longer gripped with the wartime mentality and were freed up to engage in other ventures. They were encouraged to explore the multitudes of opportunity that a victorious nation offered. And today, we can look back through those pastel-enhancing glasses and…